Assisted Living 

Smart, assistive technology is helping people of all ages live safer, more comfortable and independent lives within their own homes or in Supported Housing.
Our expertise in whole-house integration of smart technology ensures that we can offer flexible, future-proof solutions to all of your Assisted Living and Independent Living requirements. We use assistive technology to allow the differently abled and elderly to live independently and safely.
Read on for examples of the services we offer to meet day-to-day Assisted Living challenges and maintain, reinforce, and improve functional capabilities of individuals.


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Smart Security and Access Control

Security is a consideration and a concern for most of us, and particularly when we are less able to defend ourselves. This is where smart technology really can give peace of mind to anyone who is differently abled or elderly, a great example of smart technology becoming assistive.

We offer a range of smart security options to allow you to set the level of support that is right for you and your home.

Home networks can be programmed to automatically lock doors and shut blinds in order to maintain security and privacy. Motion sensors and door and window contacts can be used to trigger an alarm or an alert.

We can also offer finger print enabled access control to allow friends, family and carers access to your home. Anyone else will only be given access only if you allow it after being notified on your smart device. Alternatively, the control can be given remotely to approved contacts. An intercom will allow you to see and speak to a visitor at the front door, and even let them in, directly from a smart device. It can also track who has visited the property and when.

A designated “panic alarm” can be installed anywhere in the home. If desired, a light switch can also be setup as a trigger for the alarm when it is pressed. This can cause an alarm to sound, the lights to flash, the blinds to open and an alert sent or phone call made to a specified number.

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Automated Lighting Control

Lighting can be turned on automatically with motion to a suitable brightness for the time of the day. Where there are mobility limitations, voice controlled lighting control can be used to manage lightning ambience. Lighting is turned off when not needed based on presence and natural light levels. Lighting can also be set to turn on and off automatically to set times or at dusk and dawn for external lighting.

Lightning control can be automated to promote a healthy circadian rhythm. Warm white light with an amber hue at sunrise and sunset versus cooler, brighter light during the day.

Visual Feedback can provide extended independence for anyone that is hard of hearing. For example, the lights can flash when someone is at the door. Flashing the lights can also be used as a gentle reminder to close a door or window after it has been open for a certain amount of time or when it is time to take medication.

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Automated Window Dressing

This is another feature of smart home automation that is easily paired with lighting control.

Allows the setting of a scene at the push of a button or by calling out a voice command, closing the curtains or blinds and setting the lighting scene with very little effort.

As with lighting, we see this as assistive technology that can be preset to a routine to suit the user’s lifestyle. This could make a real difference if tasks like getting up to draw curtains or blinds are difficult to achieve.

 

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Circadian lighting

Lighting can be automated to promote a healthy circadian rhythm. Warm white light with an amber hue at sunrise and sunset – compared to cooler, brighter light during the day.

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Passive Monitoring and Alerts

Motion sensors can check for movement in different areas of the house. If unusual movement patterns are detected, a notification can be sent.

Motion sensors are also useful in ‘risk’ areas of the home, such as the stairs and bathroom. They can monitor movement within the area itself and can be linked together to track movement to and from these areas. This is useful if there is a risk of falls; if the last motion detected was on the stairs and no subsequent motion in another area of the house, for example.

There are lots of ways that simple sensors can be used for assistive purposes. Examples of this are:

Water sensor: A discreet, wireless sensor that detects the presence of water. It can trigger alerts if the sink or bath overflows, a pipe bursts or a washing machine leaks.
Appliance sensors: Keep track of whether appliances, such as kettles or toasters are being used. A simple smart socket can monitor when the kettle is boiled, and if the device is not used within a set period of time, a notification can be sent out. The appliance can also be controlled remotely via a smart device, so if an appliance was left on by accident, a carer or relative could switch it off from afar.
Water temperature sensor: Water temperature sensors can reduce the risk of being scalded. As part of an integrated system, a water temperature sensor in the bath or shower could signal the bathroom lights to flash red if the water is too hot and blue if it’s below the acceptable temperature threshold.

Motion sensor-based voice prompts could provide a reminder to switch off a kitchen appliance, lock a bathroom window etc. Audible reminders do not need to rely on motion sensors. They can be setup to play at specified times during the day – a reminder to take medication, or that a carer is due to arrive soon, reminders to put the bins out, birthdays and so on…

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Energy Efficiency through Climate Control

Cooling, heating, and climate control in your home can be managed using smart technology to assist day to day living. It also means that your family or carer can keep an eye on it for you remotely and you can use voice activation or an app to adjust the temperature if you feel uncomfortable. This has the potential to save you a lot of time, stress and money.

The elderly often feel the cold more, so temperature sensors can keep an eye on the temperature in the house and either automatically adjust the heating via smart radiator valves, or send an alert to a carer.

Smart heating control runs in the interest of energy efficiency based on schedules, movement and the state of doors or windows.

 

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Audio & Video Systems

Home entertainment can be voice activated or controlled from your smart device, making it easy to use and enjoy.

TVs and sound systems can be installed in as many rooms as desired. A great feature of smart Audio and Audio-Visual Systems is that they can all be connected to each other. Instead of the potential frustration and difficulty caused by multiple remotes, smart technology allows centralised access to all these systems

 

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Supported Housing and iSmart…


For multiple-unit developments, we can offer bespoke, flexible and future-proof Assisted Living solutions. Our installations can be tailored to incorporate additional functionality should an individual’s needs change. Each installation can be monitored centrally. For example, a single carer can receive alerts for one or more properties or patients. This allows for individual care without the need for round-the-clock dedicated monitoring.

Smart technology we offer

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